October 1, 2016

Should You Care? Salt Lake City Issues At A Glance

Back by popular demand

Democracy is not a spectator sport. If we don’t participate, we stand to be subjects rather than masters. Within our local community our vote and voice can make the most impact. In our May issue of Utah Stories we presented some local issues that are worthwhile to understand. Back by popular demand, here are the latest issues that the City Council and Community Councils are debating. You can make a difference by writing or calling your City Council member and voicing your opinion, or you can come to any of the public City Council meetings and speak on any issue for three minutes.

Should You Care? Salt Lake City Issues At A Glance

Yalecrest and Westmoreland Historic District A temporary moratorium on demolitions within the Yalecrest and Westmoreland districts expired Sept. 10th, and following a public hearing, the demolition rule has been officially rejected. Opponents to the plan called it, “hastily drafted,” and don’t want changes made to their homes regulated by the Historic Landmarks Commission. This has been a highly contested issue for Sugarhouse residents, and proponents of the preservation plan believe people will change their minds when historic homes are razed and “character robbing mega-homes” built in their place. Neighborhood groups are asked to report back by Jan. 15th.
Panhandling Ordinance The latest draft of a city ordinance under consideration by the City Council this month will criminalize commercial solicitation (panhandling). The ordinance will, “impose specific time, place and manner restrictions” including specific streets and, “places where people are a ‘captive audience.'” The penalty for violating the proposed ordinance will be a six-month term in jail, a $1,000 fine, or both.
Parley’s Canyon road bike lane Following a recent public meeting, it has been decided to remove a parking lane on one side of the road to make room for bike lanes on Parley’s Canyon Blvd.
Parley’s Gulch Dog Park Restoration plans for Tanner Park released at the end of August will restrict the off-leash dog park from 88 acres to two 10 acre sections to allow for park cleanup in “overused” areas and additional bike trail sections. Dog owners argue that the park is unique because it’s the only dog park with access to natural water, while bicyclist’s have many trails and don’t need another. City Council is taking comments.